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Thursday, May 21

  1. page Robert E Lee & Ulysses S Grant edited ... Janruary 16, 1807: Robert Edward Lee is born in Stratford Hall, Virginia. Early Life: He was …
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    Janruary 16, 1807: Robert Edward Lee is born in Stratford Hall, Virginia.
    Early Life: He was the son of Henry Richard Lee and Ann Hill Carter Lee.His father was a Revolutionary War hero and left the family when Robert was six. With increasing financial problems, Robert pursued a career in the military. After graduating highschool, he went to the United States Military Academy at Westpoint when he was 18. In 1892 he graduated second in his class with no demerits. He was very popular and handsome and therefore liked by students and professors. Due to his popularity and well developed leadership qualities he was appointed as second luitenant of the Engineer Corps on July 1, 1820. He was later appointed to first luitenant, but it was a time of peace and he fought no battles.
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    the second valvartcalvary in Texas.
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    was sent beby the forming
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    to stop JognJohn Brown's Slave REbellionRebellion in October
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    promoted to firtfirst colonel of the first valvartcalvary in 181 bt1861 by the time
    Civil War: On April 18 Robert E. Lee was asked by Abraham Lincoln to take control of the Union after the Confederates attacked Fort Sumter. He declined the opportunity saying he would not take up arms against his native state, Virginia. Later, he accepted a role as the leading officer of the Virginia state army and was then promoted to a full general of the Confederate army on August 31, 1861. He did not recieve much action on the battlefield until he took command of the Confederate army defending Richmond and fought the Seven Days Battle against McCllelan. He suffered many casualties but gained support by defending Richmond. He then beat John Pope at the Second Battle of Bull Run. Lee tried to bring the battles out of Virginia and into the Union, but after suffering from desertion of a ragged army faced McCllelan's army of 80,000 with 35,000 of his own at the bloodiest battle of Antietam. Lee upset Burnside's army of 125,000 with his own 75,000 at the Battle of Fickersburg gaining the optimisim from Southern citizens. His greatest upset was when he upset Hooker's 120,000 men with only 60,000 men through daring and ingenious war tactics in the battle of Chancellorsville in April of 1863. His greatest challenge took place on July 1 when his army of 75,000 marched into Pennsylvania and fought the Federals at the Battle of Gettysburg. He took full responsibility for the defeat.
    Ulysses S Grant
    {Ulysses_S.jpg} General Ulysses S. GrantApril 27, 1822: Ulysses Simpson Grantwas born in Point Pleasant, Ohio. He was the son of Jesse and Hannah Simpson Grant.
    Early Life: He had a hard time living up to his father's expectations and was moody and sensetive, but well-educated. He was also sent to the United States Military Academy at Westpoint from 1839-1843. He was an average student, but an excellent horsemen.
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    the war, hehis luck in
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    eager to joingjoin the Union
    CROSSROADS:
    {Lee_and_Ulysses.jpg} Lee surrends to Grant in the Appomattox Court HouseIn the Spring of 1864 the paths of these to legendary generals crossed. The North thought that they finally had a general who could defeat Robert E. Lee, but the South was confident in their longtime savior. With the support of Lincoln, Grant took all of the Union armies into the South to defeat them quickly to start the showdown between Lee and Grant, later called the Overland Campaign. Northern Virginia mustered only 60,000 troops to battle the North's 120,000. A series of battles including the Battle of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania tolled many deaths for both generals, although Lee only suffered a suprising 1,500 casualties compared to Grant's 7,500 casualties in the battle of Cold Harbor. Finally, on June 18, the Overland Campaign ended when Grant made a move that caught Lee by surprise, they stormed across the rivers and tried to capture Petersburg, about 20 miles from Richmond. Lee's forces quickly came to the defense, but Grants army held a seige on the city. The siege lasted nine months until Lee tried to break hold of the seige, but Grant easily broke through the lines protecting Petersburg and Richmond in the Battle of Five Forks, forcing Lee's army to flee on April 3rd. Lee hoped to meet up with Johnston's army in North Carolina, but the end was near, and Grant was too strong. All Lee had left to do was give up, so April 9, 1865 the war's two most famous generals met peacefully in the parlor of Wilmer McLean's home in Appomattox Court House to negotiate. Grant offered generous terms, Lee accepted them, and they both signed a contract of surrender.
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  2. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... Quiz on CW places and people Confederate States of America: producer's explanation!!! Bibli…
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    Quiz on CW places and people
    Confederate States of America: producer's explanation!!!
    Bibliography* "Abolition."Bibliography
    "Abolition."
    Tom Laichas.
    "Nat Turner's Rebellion." Jessica McElrath. 2009. May 16, 2009.http://afroamhistory.about.com/od/natturner/a/turnerrebellion.htm
    "Cassius Clay:Biography." KET White Hall Field Trips. January 5, 2006. May 16, 2009.http://www.ket.org/trips/whitehall/clay_1.htm
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    8:31 am
  3. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... Harriet Tubman Animation Video -Racist Commercial: what United States might have been like to…
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    Harriet Tubman Animation Video
    -Racist Commercial: what United States might have been like today/Confederate Family
    Bibliography
    "Abolition."
    Fun Sites about the Civil War!!!
    MY ABOLITIONIST CROSSWORD!
    Fun Abolitionist Skit Video
    Civil War Fun Facts
    Quiz on CW places and people
    Confederate States of America: producer's explanation!!!
    Bibliography* "Abolition."
    Tom Laichas.
    "Nat Turner's Rebellion." Jessica McElrath. 2009. May 16, 2009.http://afroamhistory.about.com/od/natturner/a/turnerrebellion.htm
    "Cassius Clay:Biography." KET White Hall Field Trips. January 5, 2006. May 16, 2009.http://www.ket.org/trips/whitehall/clay_1.htm
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    "Hinton Rowan Helper." Documenting the American South. William S. Powell. 1996. May 18, 2009.http://docsouth.unc.edu/browse/bios/pn0000711_bio.html
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    Fun Sites about the Civil War!!!
    MY ABOLITIONIST CROSSWORD!
    Fun Abolitionist Skit Video
    Civil War Fun Facts
    Quiz on CW places and people
    Confederate States of America: producer's explanation!!!

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    8:30 am
  4. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... "Hinton Rowan Helper." Documenting the American South. William S. Powell. 1996. May …
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    "Hinton Rowan Helper." Documenting the American South. William S. Powell. 1996. May 18, 2009.http://docsouth.unc.edu/browse/bios/pn0000711_bio.html
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    Civil War!!!
    MY

    MY
    ABOLITIONIST CROSSWORD! !!
    Fun Abolitionist Skit Video
    Civil War Fun Facts
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    8:21 am
  5. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... Abolitionism in the Civil War Becky Higgins May 20,2009 Intro Abolitionists in the Civ…
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    Abolitionism in the Civil War
    Becky Higgins May 20,2009
    Intro
    Abolitionists in the Civil War promoted the idea of annulment of slavery in the United States and overall wanted slaves and Americans to be equal. The
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    Emancipation Proclamation (1863) most(1863)most interesting abolitionists,
    The word "abolition" is often paired with the Civil War. Three major types of abolitionists existed in the United States. Slave abolitionists, women abolitionists, and racist abolitionists were all for the abolishment of slavery but they had very different values and did not necessarily protest because they wanted slaves to be equal. The Civil War was the first major battle where the United States had to split friends, families and former alliances because of their view on slavery. Although initially the war was about preserving the Union, the main disagreement between Southerners and abolitionists was the issue of slavery.
    Abolitionists were normally Northern males that worked with the government and President Lincoln and wanted to preserve the Union. Two groups stood out as unique and interesting, slave and women abolitionists. These groups contained United States citizens who may have not been noticed in society, but were taking great strides to free the slaves and create a perfect Union. Another unique group of abolitionists were "racist" abolitionists. They wanted the eventual abolishment of slavery but did not necessarily feel that people of another race were equal to them.
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  6. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... Abolitionists worked with the union army as well as in secret to help promote the annulment of…
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    Abolitionists worked with the union army as well as in secret to help promote the annulment of slavery. On the battlefield abolitionists worked as nurses to tend to the sick and give them hope. They also worked as prominant slaves, sneaking into Confederate troops and leading them to awaiting Union armies. Generals were astounded when Harriet Tubman lead an army of 800 soldiers to a Confederate hideout. Many abolitionists did not work on the actual battlefield. They worked closely with Lincoln to help keep abolitionist ideas in government and lead large protests to spread he word of slavery.
    Without abolitionism as a key factor in the Civil War, the issues of slavery would have have been pushed aside and eventually, Americans would have had to deal with it centuries later. These brave citizens risked their lives to recreate the perfect union and try to bring equality in America. Obviously, the South struggled after the war was over, but eventually industrialized and found new ways to make profits. Abolitionism defined the Civil war and was the largest test to see if our nation really is the "land of the free."
    Harriet Tubman Animation Video
    -Racist Commercial: what United States might have been like today/Confederate Family
    Bibliography
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Wednesday, May 20

  1. page Abolitionism in the Civil War edited ... Becky Higgins May 20,2009 Intro ... be equal. But the The {The_Emancipation_Proclam…
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    Becky Higgins May 20,2009
    Intro
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    be equal. But theThe
    {The_Emancipation_Proclamation-1.jpg} Lincoln's
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    that were either not expected toa prominent part of society. The Northern mindset during thisthe war may have beenwas against slavery but theslavery,but their reason people thought thisfor opposing slavery was not
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    based upon wantingan equilibriumwanting equality of races
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    the slaves.
    The word "abolition" is often paired with the Civil War.
    Three major
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    the United States that proved different kinds of abolitionists had extremely unique mindsets.States. Slave abolitionists,
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    slavery but they had very
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    be equal. The word "abolition" is often paired with the Civil War. The Civil
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    the main frustration behinddisagreement between Southerners and
    Abolitionists were normally Northern males that worked with the government and President Lincoln and wanted to preserve the Union. Two groups stood out as unique and interesting, slave and women abolitionists. These groups contained United States citizens who may have not been noticed in society, but were taking great strides to free the slaves and create a perfect Union. Another unique group of abolitionists were "racist" abolitionists. They wanted the eventual abolishment of slavery but did not necessarily feel that people of another race were equal to them.
    Background Information
    The Civil War is remembered today as a war about slavery. Southern slaves were the major work force for the South and the backbone of their economy. The South was used to its conservative, traditional ways, and slavery was the most cost-efficient and helpful form of labor for the South. On January 1, 1863 Lincoln created the Emancipation Proclamation. This bill stated that the War was not just to preserve the Union but also the complete annulment of slavery. This completely changed the stakes of the war. Abolitionists were ecstatic and had more hope. Slaves were enlightened and began to escape quicker to the North to join the Union war efforts {sam_sewall_pic.jpg} Sam Sewall: a reformed abolitionist who helped during the Civil War. The South was enraged at this new law. It was the first time a president, not congress, had declared war. Usually the word abolition immediately sparks reference to the Civil War. This is because the Civil War was the first time that abolitionists were so actively present in war efforts and so strongly against a particular side. War efforts included serving as a spy, serving as a nurse or doctor , or helping build war machines and technology .
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    idea annuling slavery alltogether.slavery. These liberal
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    all slaves hadsupported the abolition idealogies.of slavery. Most abolitionists
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    society, but three other major types of slaveryabolitionists existed in
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    inequality and inforcedsupported aboltionism as
    Abolitionists predominately gathered in the North, but some Southerners opposed slavery as well. Cassius M. Clay (1810-1903) was a Southern abolitionist nickamed "Cash" was born in Clermont Kentucky. Clay was known as an emancipationist moreso than an abolitionist because he wanted to abolish slavery but keep within the boundries of our constitution. He delivered many speeches as the representative for Madison County, Kentucky; most of which included discouragement about slavery.
    One important fact to note is that not all abolitionists wanted slaves to be equal to them, but they still approved the annulment of slavery. The reasons for this may have been that they wanted the North to keep it's strong political power and thriving industries and wanted the South to pose less of an economic threat. The term for this particular group of abolitionists will be referred to as "racist abolitionists."
    Slave Abolitionists
    Although the enormityvast majority of slaves
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    against their massters,masters, escape, or
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    family still entrappedtrapped in slavery.
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    make them seeseem sub-human and
    Violent:
    Nat Turner (1800-1831) was born in Southampton County, Virginia. Turner became a preacher and encountered many "visions" that guided his actions. His most life-altering vision was on May 12, 1838, where he claimed God came to him and told him to rebel against the "Serpent" (which he conceived were the Southern masters.) On August 22,1831 led a group of six slaves to kill their master and rebel against white Southerners. More than fifty white Southerners were killed in the revolt. Nat Turner was later captured and hanged in Virginia. Turner was an example of a slave abolitionist who used fighting as a way to protest slavery, but other (former) slaves tried different tactics.
    Peaceful:
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    last name toin honor of the people who had helped him greatly and places he visited.him. During his
    {frederick_douglass.jpg} Frederick Douglass in his later years
    Women Abolitionists
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    not expected from then.of them. During that
    {Lydiachild.jpg} Lydia Maria ChildNorth:
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    in the Favorfavor of that Classclass of Americans
    South:
    Mary Boykin Miller Chesnut (1823-1886) was born on March 31 in Stateboro, South Carolina. In 1840, she married James Chesnut Jr. who was a prominant landowner of the time. Her husband had a strong political position in government, and oddly, worked for Jefferson Davis, the president of the United States of the Confederacy for a while. Both Chesnut and her husband did not believe in slavery and thought it was injust and cruel. However, Southerners were not happy with the election of Lincoln as the new President. In 1860, her husband quit his occupation as senator because he did not believe in the general Southern morals and values expressed in the governmental meetings. Mary realized that tension was building within the "two" governments and knew an imminent collision of the two forces was approaching. She began to record a diary in the winter of 1861. Chesnut had a unique view of the war because her husband worked in government, therefore she witnessed major political events such as sessions of the Confederate Provisional Conferences. Her diary was also unique because it provided an abolitionist's inside view on specific Southern turning points during the war.
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    Harriet Tubman was born as a slave on the Edward Brodas plantation in Dorchester County, Maryland. Her exact birth date is unknown because slaves' birthdays were not celebrated or recorded by their masters. Even if a slave heard the date, they could not record or recognize it in writing because they were illiterate. She was born Arminta but as a child was nicknamed "Minty" and later nicknamed "Moses." When Harriet was only twelve years old she was struck in the head by a weight that her master had thrown at her. She had been trying to save another slave. From this experience, she would have seizures and dizzy spells for the rest of her life. During the antebellum period, she helped over 300 Southern slaves escape to freedom in the North and created the system that we now know as the "Underground Railroad." She worked hard jobs in the North to get money to support her lengthy trips. Tubman risked her life hundreds of times to help out women, men, and children alike living on plantations. Her efforts continued during the Civil War (1861-1865). The Underground Railroad continued and was the main transportation for slaves which helped the abolitionist cause. Harriet was very close friend's with John Brown and helped initiate the attack on Harper's Ferry. Her efforts continued on the battlefield. She worked as nurse, spy and cook for the Union, and helped show them useful Confederate targets. Even after the war, her efforts continued as a women suffragist. Similar to the other two women, she had a book published based on her experiences during the Civil War and the rest of her life.
    Racist Abolitionists
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    Rights movement, centuriesa century later, this pushed aside topic would be resolved.resurface. The Civil
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    may have solvesolved the issue
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    against for centuriesdecades to come.
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    a race equalibrium.equality.
    Example: Hinton Rowan Helper was born near Mocksville, North Carolina on December 27, 1829. His first book, California Land of Gold: Reality vs. Fiction described his (failed) attempt during the Gold Rush. Oddly, in that book, he refers to abolitionists as "meddling." In 1857 he published {helpers_book.jpg} Helper's book that changed the Civil Warhis most famous novel, The Impending Crisis of the South: How to Meet it.
    Excerpt: "It is expected that the stupid and sequacious masses, the white victims of slavery, will believe, and, as a general thing, they do believe, whatever the slaveholders tell them; and thus it is that they are cajoled into the notion that they are the freest, happiest and most intelligent people in the world, and are taught to look with prejudice and disapprobation upon every new principle or progressive movement. Thus it is that the South, woefully inert and inventionless, has lagged behind the North, and is now weltering in the cesspool of ignorance and degradation."
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    extremely radical and insane for that
    Abolitionist's Role in the War
    Abolitionists worked with the union army as well as in secret to help promote the annulment of slavery. On the battlefield abolitionists worked as nurses to tend to the sick and give them hope. They also worked as prominant slaves, sneaking into Confederate troops and leading them to awaiting Union armies. Generals were astounded when Harriet Tubman lead an army of 800 soldiers to a Confederate hideout. Many abolitionists did not work on the actual battlefield. They worked closely with Lincoln to help keep abolitionist ideas in government and lead large protests to spread he word of slavery.
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    8:14 pm

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